Wednesday, January 02, 2008

Food Predictions for 2008

Seems as if everyone from Reuters to Gourmet is casting their ballots on what was and will be the next big thing in food. I may as well put on my best attempt at channeling Jean Dixon and Julia Child and toss out a few myself. Here goes:

A return to what's real. As we find everything around us is fabricated from our food supply to the lie of "weapons of mass destruction,"Americans will search for something honest — both on our plates and in Washington.

More muckraking to expose harmful food politics, especially the in the meat industry. Fact is, the meat industry is more incestuous now than in the great trust-busting days of Teddy Roosevelt. A few good Farm Bill tidbits put the brakes on selling cloned animal products for now and will prevent slaughterhouses from owning the animals fourteen days prior to slaughter as well as other livestock reforms. It's not much, but when you consider the full nelson these companies have had on the market, it's a good start. I'll be right there with Ethicurean and ELC and the rest of the kids blogging away.

The reduction of high-fructose corn syrup in food products. With the price of corn soaring, HFCS will no longer be a cheaper than sugar. Look for bold statements on packaging "Now! HFCS-free!" as if the company is doing something for your health. Bullshit. They only changed because the price of corn went up. As did the price of the food product.

Michael Pollan's new book will be more anticipated than the last Harry Potter book. Yeah, right. Maybe just in this household. Still, the Patron Saint of Real Food will stay around to keep us on the right track for 2008.

The decline of Rachel Ray. Yep, the honeymoon is over. Just like that starter marriage you can't believe ever happened. Or the pop song in heavy rotation. RR and EVOO will go. Viewers will want to see real chefs and real cooking again, even if they have to watch them on PBS. Don't feel too bad, she's made a fortune and she'll be just yummo.

Yep, 2008 is looking up.

10 comments:

jen said...

these are excellent. i'd love to see HFCS disappear.

Bonnie said...

I fear nothing, nothing can get Rachael Ray off the Food Network. (Not that *I* watch her; we gave up cable.) That's the only prediction I disagree with.

Ryan said...

I have followed this blog for a couple months, and the repeated snide political comments have always been a turn off. We all know US politics could have myriad improvements. Referencing the War in Iraq adds nothing to a supposed food blog. I am sorry to say that I am finally going to remove my RSS subscription.

Melinda said...

Wow. Well, to counter what Ryan said, I enjoy your blog very much. And I think politics and food quite often go hand in hand - I love that you acknowledge and address that. It's refreshing, and I think it's extremely important.

The Expatriate Chef said...

Sorry, Ryan. It's the kitchen, and we cook and talk, and share our lives and opinions. I am frustrated with the current state of affairs, likely from following the food politics so closely this year. Honestly, I believe that this frustration is a part of our country's culture right now and it will deeply impact our choices in everything from food to polls to, well, everything, in the coming year. Here's to awareness and positive change. I hope you'll visit the kitchen again in the future. But there are a ton of wonderful sites that are only dedicated to recipes, too. Best of luck to you.

tut-tut said...

You can't please everyone; I love your blog! I get a LOT of information here, so don't change, please.

Frankly, one of the (many) reasons we gave up all but the very basic cable is because the Food Network finally fizzled out; nothing but Best Of, Al Roker, and the likes of Mses. Ray, Deane et al. Yuck.

Kim said...

In fact, I think that choices we make about what we eat is one of the most intimate reflections, really, of our beliefs!

Judy said...

I hope I see less of Rachael Ray this year; she's so annoying! Didn't know the price of HFCS was going up-- I've never really worried about that-- I just try not to eat too much sugar in general...

Jennifer said...

I know i'm late in posting, but I think it's important to realize that what goes on in washington affects our food industry in many ways. What happens on wall street affects our industry too - and a nation at war affects our kitchens.

It helps that I agree, perhaps. :) With every single thing I've read here so far.

Thank you so much for this blog, and for helping me to realize i'm not the only one who thinks this way about all these different things.

Expatriate Chef said...

Thanks for visiting! I think I was right on a couple (HFCS and the meat industry scandals) but we still have a long way to go!